Your Mission. Your Voice. Take a peek inside my process for creating, lettering, and designing these passion posters for Voice A Story Magazine.

Your mission. Your voice.

On creating visual passion statements for Voice A Story Magazine.

 

Just over a month ago, I had the pleasure of sharing some of my favorite hand lettering work to date with the world through Voice A Story Magazine. If you don’t know, I am lucky to be the Creative Director of this digital magazine, so in addition to creating it’s very first physical product to sell in collaboration with South Ranch Creative, I also design each quarterly issue, create marketing graphics and images, and keep the website looking sleek and up-to-date.

 

WHOAH, you’re thinking. She’s got a LOT of passion for this company. And you’re right. My work as Creative Director for this magazine is currently 100% pro bono because the mission behind this magazine, this movement, is both powerful and necessary. And that’s where this whole idea started. The mission statement of Voice A Story magazine is as follows:

 

We are a magazine devoted to telling worthwhile and relevant stories, conducting thoughtful interviews, and publishing excellent fiction, poetry, and art without the media biased lens of what is or is not "news." We think people should able to define their own news based on things that really matter to them, rather than what the media thinks is sexy, dramatic, or contentious. Our goal is to point people to news and stories that matter. But we want to do more than that. For every issue of our magazine that is purchased, we donate one dollar to a hand picked nonprofit that’s helping give others a voice or bringing a voice to an issue. It is our belief that the best stories are the ones that have not yet been told, and we promise to do our best to provide the most relevant content on things that really matter, whether it is mainstream news or not. - Voice A Story Magazine

 

We are a magazine devoted to telling worthwhile and relevant stories, conducting thoughtful interviews, and publishing excellent fiction, poetry, and art without the media biased lens of what is or is not “news.” We think people should able to define their own news based on things that really matter to them, rather than what the media thinks is sexy, dramatic, or contentious. Our goal is to point people to news and stories that matter. But we want to do more than that.

 

For every issue of our magazine that is purchased, we donate one dollar to a hand picked nonprofit that’s helping give others a voice or bringing a voice to an issue. It is our belief that the best stories are the ones that have not yet been told, and we promise to do our best to provide the most relevant content on things that really matter, whether it is mainstream news or not.

 

The idea.

 

I created this visual mission statement for Voice A Story because I wanted the mission statement to not only tell of our passion and dreams, but show it. A visual portrayal of emphasis, passion, dedication, and most importantly, flaws was built to prove to readers that we mean what we say and we mean. We are here to share stories that matter from people and charities that have something powerful to say.

 

Our mission statement simmered in the back of my mind for weeks, as I continued to feel empowered by its message. I thought to myself, why not bring this same message of empowerment to our readers, our contributors, our supporters? To our adventurers, our storytellers, our activists, and our dreamers? That is the heart and soul of Voice A Story.

 

Process shot of hand lettering Voice A Story Magazine's Mission Statement. I created this visual mission statement for Voice A Story because I wanted the mission statement to not only tell of our passion and dreams, but show it. A visual portrayal of emphasis, passion, dedication, and most importantly, flaws was built to prove to readers that we mean what we say and we mean. We are here to share stories that matter from people and charities that have something powerful to say.

 

Putting our mission into action.

 

I set out excitedly sharing this idea with Voice A Story’s Founder and Editor-In-Chief, Ryan. With the rest of the VAS team, we set out to collaboratively write four passion statements for the adventurer, storyteller, activist, and dreamer. It has a little bit of all of us in it, and we hope it speaks to you too. These missions are both utterly personal and globally understood. We find commonality in our deepest convictions, where we can acknowledge our differences but see the beauty and strength in this thing we both feel.

 

These passion statements were written entirely by hand, with minimal retouching for prints. Because for me, it is important to recognize the inherent power in our very fingertips. That, while they may have flaws or hit a few bumps along the way, have the incredible power to create and feel and build. That we don’t need computer and technology and money to be fulfilled. We need passion and humility and creation.

 

Inspiration is a powerful tool because it allows us to see that we are the masters of our life, and thus we have the ability to shift and shape it into something good, something meaningful, something better than what came before.

 

 

So which are you?

 

You may notice that the four pillars of Voice A Story relate strongly to the core of South Ranch Creative: create. dream. explore. act. So it was incredibly difficult for me to say that I am not every one of these things! Let’s be real, most of us are probably at LEAST two and I know that in my own way I AM all of these things and more!

 

The print that kept me coming back, though, was the activist print. I praise many of the wise words of my friend Sara in this statement, for she (and we) were able to touch on everything I care about in six little sentences. Because activism is about donating or volunteering for nonprofits. It’s about the deeply felt belief that you are an equal being to every other on this planet. It’s about the feeling of obligation to lift up those who are down, in trust that you will be lifted up when you need it. It’s about humility and service and using your voice. Creation, art, crafts, design. Those are all tools for me to act. To be the person I want to be and help others do the same.

 

The print that kept me coming back, though, was the activist print. I praise many of the wise words of my friend Sara in this statement, for she (and we) were able to touch on everything I care about in six little sentences. Because activism is about donating or volunteering for nonprofits. It’s about the deeply felt belief that you are an equal being to every other on this planet. It’s about the feeling of obligation to lift up those who are down, in trust that you will be lifted up when you need it. It’s about humility and service and using your voice. Creation, art, crafts, design. Those are all tools for me to act. To be the person I want to be and help others do the same.

 


Which are you? The activist? The storyteller? The adventurer? The dreamer? Are you all four or something else entirely? I’d love to hear your story and which poster resonates both with you. They are available for purchase here so check them out along with our latest issue of the magazine! For a limited time, you can bundle issue 04 (our most recent issue) with a passion print of your choosing to get the ultimate passion package deal! That deal is available here and you can feel great about your purchase because $1 of every current magazine purchase goes to our featured charity of that issue. Issue 04’s featured charity is Far Away Friends, a brilliant and youthful nonprofit that just put the finishing touches on a school they built from the ground up in Namasale, Uganda.

 

So my adventures, my activists, my storytellers, my dreamers, and my CREATIVES, never stop looking for your passion and working towards the reality of it. You may just surprise yourself when you make it.



Stay creative. Stay you.

-B

 

Your Mission. Your Voice. Take a peek inside my process for creating, lettering, and designing these passion posters for Voice A Story Magazine.
Voice A Story is a different kind of magazine, with the goal of teaching, inspiring, and motivating people of all ages through stories of dedicated nonprofits, relevant current news and happenings, and passionate art, photography, and writing projects by young professionals and enthusiasts. It is not your typical news magazine.

What it Means to Voice A Story

This is the first of a series of posts on a magazine called Voice A Story that you will find under the “Act” category of South Ranch Creative’s blog. Act stands for activism. It stands for caring about more than just your own needs and desires. It stands for taking action on things you are passionate about, and not backing down when you face resistance.
Voice A Story magazine logo

Voice A Story magazine was developed by a good friend and fellow activist of mine, Ryan William Flynn. Voice A Story is a different kind of magazine, with the goal of teaching, inspiring, and motivating people of all ages through stories of dedicated nonprofits, relevant current news and happenings, and passionate art, photography, and writing projects by young professionals and enthusiasts. It is not your typical news magazine.

 

In today’s age, we have an issue in what is and is not news, what is considered journalism, what is considered “worth printing”. We have media with extreme bias, thrown easily by political ideology, prejudice to the usual “if it bleeds, it leads”, with a focus on what is easy to explain. This is what Voice A Story Magazine is not. -Ryan Flynn

 

I had the distinct honor of being invited to be Voice A Story magazine’s head Graphic Designer and Web Manager back in August 2015 when the magazine was just in infancy. Without hesitation I said yes. I had just graduated college in May, didn’t have a full time job, and accepted a position at an infant online magazine that didn’t have the means yet to pay any staff members. So why?

 

Sometimes supporting the thing that is right, the thing that means something, the thing that is bigger than you alone is the most important thing you can do, and the rest can wait. I believe that we all have an important story to tell, and this magazine has the potential to serve as the light to all of those voices. The voices that would otherwise go unheard.

 

Since August, I have watched us build a passionate and loving team of eight superstars that run every aspect of the magazine, create a brand, website, and various social media accounts, publish the first two issues of the magazine and cover operating costs in the process, and donate $1 of every sale made to a chosen charity for each issue. My heart is full of pride for what we have done, however small or large you may perceive those accomplishments.

 

Voice A Story is a different kind of magazine, with the goal of teaching, inspiring, and motivating people of all ages through stories of dedicated nonprofits, relevant current news and happenings, and passionate art, photography, and writing projects by young professionals and enthusiasts. It is not your typical news magazine.

 

Issue 02 was released today, and featured charity is an amazing organization called H2O for Life, which engages young people to become active global citizens by getting involved in service-learning opportunities relating to the global water crisis. If you’ve not yet heard of or read Voice A Story, I encourage you to give this magazine the benefit of the doubt and purchase an issue here this very instant. It could just change everything for you.

 

The magazine is only $5 and $1 of every purchase through the months of November and December go to the charity, H2O for Life. Issue 01 is also still available and can be purchased for $4, the featured interview with Jamie Tworkowski, founder of To Write Love on Her Arms.

 

Keep taking action.
-B

For me it means a lot of doing everything I love: working for nonprofits, selling my arts and crafts and design, and working with a lot of good friends. Unfortunately it also means a lot of selling myself short of what I deserve.

What it’s really like graduating from college with a degree in “Art.”

 

As a recent graduate from Virginia Tech with a degree in Art, concentration Visual Communication Design, I feel compelled to let the world know what it’s actually like graduating from college with an art degree in the year 2015.

 

Starving Artist.

 

If you’re a creative like me, or are close with one, I’m sure you’ve heard it all. You may have even caught yourself saying it. Does the phrase, “starving artist” sound familiar? Have you been asked what you actually do or what you’re going to do when you graduate? Oh wait, they already know that. You just make things pretty. Have you cringed at overhearing a marketing student declare they plan to learn Illustrator and web design in ONE day? Have you been asked to design a logo for…. $20?

 

One day, standing on the stage as an outstanding senior at your own graduation, the next, jobless and living back at home, wondering, "what did I do wrong?"

 

As College of Architecture and Urban Studies’ 2015 Outstanding Senior, I was asked to sit on the stage at my own graduation.

 

Through my own personal experiences, I still find that art and design is still a hugely undervalued profession. Because I have been asked to design a logo for $20. And if it’s not undervalued, then the time it takes to complete the desired project is severely underestimated. The thing about good design is that when it’s really, truly successful, it’s almost silent.

 

“A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” -Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

 

The Macchiato Effect.

 

And when it’s silent, people don’t realize that their emotions, their immediate reaction to the content that is being served to them, is a result of the design of the content, not just the content itself. So they will pay an extra $2 for that magnificent looking spiced caramel macchiato, but gawk at the freelance designer that wants to charge them $1000 for a new logo for their small business. But consider this: if they pay more up front for that new logo, but end up getting double the business as a result of the good design, that $1000 now seems well worth the investment.

 

Update: Just for clarity I want to say that $1000 was just a blind example for the sake of my argument. Logo cost depends entirely on the size of the client, experience of the designer, complexity of the project, and much more. 

 

I never really considered working for a big design agency post-graduation. A lot of my colleagues did, and the good news is, they are by and large doing great. But for someone like me, looking for a small quirky design studio, a nonprofit, or full time freelance work, the opportunities to make a living wage no longer look quite as optimistic. And it’s not because I’m a worse designer, less motivated, or would have a more leisurely work-life. I would actually be far more motivated to work for an organization I am passionate about, and would work harder as a result. So what is it, then?

 

I think it depends on where you look. Unfortunately for a small design studio, the possibility of them just not having enough money to pay you more is actually realistic. Not one, but two of the small studios I interviewed at during and post-graduation ended up having to tell me that while they loved my work and would love to have me, they “just didn’t have the money right now” to hire me. In the eyes of someone new to this world, it seemed tragic that these wonderful, passionate designers couldn’t expand their businesses, even in their success, because it is just too expensive for them to do so.

 

But let’s get back to that caramel macchiato. Nonprofits and individuals looking to hire freelancers fall into this trap more often than not, at least in my small realm of experience. And I think others see this too. It is the traditional format of a nonprofit to spend very little on this dirty word, “overhead.” Overhead is any spending that is not going directly to the cause, such as administrative or fundraising costs. This concept doesn’t seem so bad, right? Less money spent on administration and fundraising means more money going towards the cause, right? But then think about that overhead as that $1000 spent on a logo. If spending a little bit more on overhead to fundraise, to promote, and to have good powerful design allows that nonprofit to double the money they raise that year, then they are still raising as much if not more money for the cause, even with a higher percentage of their spending going to overhead. I encourage you to watch this Ted Talk by activist, entrepreneur, and founder of Charity Defense Council, Dan Pallotta, on overhead and the way we think about charity spending.

 

The macchiato effect is perhaps most strong in individuals. That $20 I was asked to do a logo for? I was asked by an individual. A student. While I know firsthand the struggles of being a poor college student, I also think this goes deeper than that. Let’s go all the way back to the thought that oh, designers just make things pretty. It may be well and true that we make your shop logo look prettier, but it is so much more than that. It’s about sending a powerful message. And developing a powerful, meaningful message takes time, skill, and a lot of hard work. Think about how many people are going to see that logo, that business card. It is profoundly important to how you or your business is seen by others, and you don’t even know it. Not all design is good design. So just because you can get a logo for $50 elsewhere, doesn’t mean that you’re going to get the same positive effect from the design. By 2015, we’ve become accustomed to looking for the cheapest, the fastest, and the easiest. Heck, there are massively popular websites out there in which clients can host a “contest” for designers to make their logo. It’s quick, they get tons of logos to choose from, and it’s relatively cheap. But is it really fair to ask for all this great work from designers at the mere chance for them to win? Would you work for free? I’m going to propose that you might not really be getting the highest quality of product here. You might get lucky. You might not. But you are seriously undermining the talent and hard work of a lot of designers.

 

Virginia Tech's School of Visual Art's Visual Communication Design class of 2015. And yes, we made pantone caps.

 

You Sure You Want to Know What it’s Like?

 

So what is it like graduating from college with an art degree? It’s hard. For me it means a lot of doing everything I love: working for nonprofits, selling my arts and crafts and design, and working with a lot of good friends. Unfortunately it also means a lot of selling myself short of what I deserve. Am I not charging enough because I know they can’t afford it or because I know they they think they can’t afford it or that it’s not worth that price? I’d lean towards the latter. And I don’t blame them, and I know I will continue to do this because it’s what I love to do. But if the world as a whole can learn a greater respect for what we do as artists, perhaps change will be on the horizon.

 

Keep dreaming.
-B

 

 

Artist + designer + lover of plants. Come hang with me & my aloe plant, Al, as we bring back a love of handmade to your business, nonprofit, or upcoming party ✌

Welcome to the South Ranch.

I feel like it’s customary and required to share a little bit about myself, tell ya’ll what I do and why, and give a little schpiel about my shop that makes you want to go and buy all the things. And that’s exactly what I’m going to do.

 

Hi, my name is Becca and I am the creative behind South Ranch Creative. What is a creative? To me, a creative is someone who isn’t just good at painting, or drawing, or writing, or thinking outside the box. A creative dabbles, and as someone who naturally sees beauty, elegance, and communication better than your non-creative, he/she has a small leg up when entering new creative ventures. And I LOVE to learn new things. So I start new creative ventures a lot.

 

So that leaves the South Ranch. Well friends, that is my home! I live in a sleepy rural town on 4 1/2 acres, where the biggest news of the week is when a set of teens take their horses through the McDonald’s drive-thru (not kidding). My home has been such a big influence on my work from the beginning. Not everyone has the opportunity to take fallen tree branches, old fence posts, and barbed wire from out in their yard and create a whole set of wedding decorations with it!

 

Wedding arch and table marker photographs courtesy of Summer Kelley Photography.

 

I am a recent graduate of Virginia Tech (GO HOKIES!) in Visual Communication Design and decided to start doing freelance as well as sell my arts and crafts in an attempt to eventually make a life out of it. You might say that I didn’t exactly “fit in” to your classic design agency lifestyle; I wanted to do something that was more meaningful to myself. This means working for nonprofits and not giant corporate agencies, for individuals of passion and not companies just wanting to sell you something. This means making the happiest day of someone’s life just a little more special, or creating work out of found, recycled, or reclaimed materials instead of buying new. In case you haven’t gathered this yet from my little rant, yes, I am an activist. A dirty word to some, a badge of pride to others, I have transformed over the past four years of college into someone who is more compassionate, more considerate, and exponentially more humble. And I have the nonprofit, Invisible Children to thank for that.

 

1 Year Anniversary Video Shot | "Welcome to the South Ranch" | by South Ranch Creative | www.southranchcreative.beccagrogan.comI am actually in this photo carrying the banner for the MOVE|DC in Washington, how cool is that?!?!

 

Now you know I am a creative and an activist, but what else am I? I am a dreamer. You might say that I am an optimist to a fault, and I will affectionately take that description in stride. I am always thinking about the possibilities and hoping for a better future. It may make me naive in a way, but I find it hard to put all of my passion and motivation towards a project if I don’t believe that the outcome will mean anything. Lastly, I am an adventurer. I’ve never been out of the United States, I am terrified of flying, and yet I call myself an adventurer. Adventures aren’t restricted to a location, time, or distance from home and that’s what makes them so mysterious and alluring. They are best unplanned and unmapped. My wanderlust towards nature makes me a natural environmentalist so yes, I have some hippie genes in me too.

 

All of this–my creativity, my activism, my optimism, and my wanderlust–make up the core of South Ranch Creative. They saturate the work I sell and are the base of what I will be posting about in this blog. You might find DIY projects, a photo album of my latest road trip, a post about the nonprofit I just did work for, or the history behind one of my found or reclaimed crafts. If my art and my passions resonate with you, I encourage you to join me in this journey, and I look forward to hearing about your journeys too.

 

Keep dreaming,

B

 

Check out my Etsy Shop | "Welcome to the South Ranch" | by South Ranch Creative | www.southranchcreative.beccagrogan.com